Questions

-How do I report my collision claim?
-What is a Direct Repair Shop?
-What are OEM Parts?
-What are “aftermarket” (AFM) Parts?

-What are “LKQ” Parts?
-Do I have to accept used or Aftermarket parts?
-Do I have to use the Repair Facility my insurance company recommends, or can I use the Repair Facility of my choice?
-Do I have to get more than 1 estimate?

-What happens if more damage is found?
-What is a deductible?
-Can I get other repair or service work done on my vehicle while my vehicle is under the repair process?
-How do you duplicate my Vehicle Paint Refinish?
-What is the difference between Collision Insurance and Comprehensive Insurance Coverage?
-Does Fosters Body and Paint warrant their repair work?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How Do I Report My Collision Claim?
Report your Collision Claim to your Insurance Agent or the designated Claims Center that is provided in your Insurance Policy. When you report your collision claim advise your insurance agent or Claims Center advisor of your Repair Facility choice.

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What is a Direct Repair Facility?
A direct repair facility is a Collision Repair Facility that works directly with Insurance Providers as a preferred shop. Repair Facilities earn the right to be a preferred Repair Facility based upon the quality of their repairs and their record of customer satisfaction ratings. When you use a preferred Repair Facility, the facility has the authorization to write the Damage Report, order parts and start the repair process without having to wait for a field adjustor to come out and write their Damage Report on your vehicle. Insurance providers monitor their preferred repair facilities, to ensure quality repairs, efficient claims processing and customer satisfaction ratings.

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What Are OEM Parts?
OEM stands for “Original Equipment Manufacture” and is used to describe parts made by or for the manufacturer of your vehicle. So OEM Ford Parts comes from Ford, GM OEM Parts comes from GM; Toyota OEM Parts comes from Toyota and so on. You should refer to your insurance policy to confirm what agreements are in your policy in relationship to parts.

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What Are Aftermarket “A/M” Parts?
Aftermarket (A/M) is used to describe parts that are produced by some manufacturer other than the one who originally made your car. Some aftermarket parts carry certification that helps ensure the basic quality of the part. Aftermarket parts are usually less expensive than new OEM Parts, but for some collision claims these parts may be a better choice than “Used Parts” or “OEM” parts. You should refer to your insurance policy to confirm what agreements are in your policy in relationship to parts.

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What are “LKQ” Parts?
LKQ stands for “like, kind and quality”. Most of us are more familiar with the other term for this category which is “Used Parts”. The term LKQ Parts refers to the same kind of parts that were on your vehicle before your claim of loss. You should refer to your insurance policy to confirm what agreements are in your policy in relationship to parts.

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Do I have To Use The Repair Facility My Insurance Company Recommends Or Can I Use The Repair Facility Of My Own Choice?
You can always go to the Repair Facility of your own choice.

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Do I Have To Get More Than One Estimate?
No you do not need to get multiple estimates. Your Insurance Provider will always review your Damage Estimate in order to settle your Claim Loss.

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What Happens If More Damage Is Found?
Today’s vehicles are complex, so it can be difficult to see all the damage during the initial inspection. Therefore, finding additional damage has become very common. If additional damage is found, it is documented and discussed with you and your insurance company. The insurance company may send a field adjustor out to review the additional damage or they will review the additional damage through an electronic claims process. The supplemental repairs are documented, itemized, authorized and billed to the insurance company upon the completion of the repair.

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What Is A Deductible?
A deductible is like a “co-pay” on health insurance. It is a portion of the repair bill that is not covered by your insurance policy. The amount is determined by your insurance policy and is first set when you first purchase your insurance. Deductibles are commonly $100.00, $250.00, $500.00, $1,000.00. The higher your deductible, the lower your insurance premium.

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Can I Get Other Service Work Done On My Vehicle While My Vehicle Is Under The Repair Process?
YES, Often times it is more cost effective to fix unrelated collision damage which may be on a repaired panel when the collision damage is being done.

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How Do You Duplicate My Vehicle Paint Refinish?
Today’s modern factory finishes incorporate multiple layers of highly specialized paints. Fosters Body & Paint has made a major investment in the DuPont Refinishing System which gives our facility a monthly update of the latest Refinish Formulas to ensure the Refinish of your vehicle through the collision process.

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What is the difference between Collision Insurance and Comprehensive Insurance coverage?
Collision insurance and comprehensive insurance may vary. Generally, collision insurance covers damage to your vehicle caused by a collision with another object. Comprehensive insurance covers damage to your vehicle from incidents such as vandalism, theft or glass breakage. It is generally a good idea to periodically review your policy and ask your insurance agent what exclusions are in your policy. 

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Does Fosters Body And Paint Warranty Their Repair Work?
YES, Fosters Body and Paint warranties all of their labor repairs with a Lifetime Guaranty to the owner of the vehicle at the time the repairs were made. The parts used through the repair process have their own warranty when applicable.

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